Of cows and cooking classes

Of cows and cooking classes
Orchha, India

Orchha, India


Today we had a sleep in until 10am, when we had an optional ride in a cart drawn by cows. Very unhappy cows. Cows that had little hesitance with ******* and ******** anywhere. And then flicking their tails to share the love. It was fun. All the village came out to laugh at us and wave. Some of the girls had back problems with the bumps, but it was fun going through the countryside. I did have to wash a couple of spots of poo from my feet, trousers and camera, but worth the 200 rupees. Then we packed up and 2 hour bus ride to Orcha. Orcha palace sunset and Hindu temple – to be continued The next morning, we went to the same restaurant where we had dinner the previous night, because we had spotted the banana and nutella pancakes on the menu. It was soo good with masala chai tea and the prices were ridiculously cheap. We walked back to the hotel to pack up our bags for check out. Our CEO had organised a cabin for us to dump our stuff for the day, until the train tonight. I meant to organise a massage, but I spent it chatting to people and updating Facebook and Instagram instead. In the evening, we went to a cooking class at a lady’s house, Rajni. She was very helpful, sitting on a low stool in front of the group using a gas stove and providing us with paper and pen to scrawl each ingredient as she called it out and added it to the pot. We taught us how to make masala chai tea, okra curry, potato and chickpea curry, eggplant curry, bundi raita, vegetable rice, conker berry chutney (sour and spicy, very delicious), puri (a kind of bread that puffed up with a big air pocket in the middle when dunked into the oil) and chapati. We then had a buffet dinner of the resulting dishes. Very tasty, but I was very aware of the amount of oil and salt called for in each recipe. Unsurprising that India’s biggest killer is cardiovascular disease (followed by respiratory disease from the pollution). Then back to the hotel to get the bus to Jhansi and take our overnight train to Varanasi. We arrived early, so our CEO set us up in a waiting area, where I started talking to some Indian girls, and getting an impromptu Hindi lesson. I also gave them some Japanese words to take away. The train itself had really narrow corridors. In each bay, on one side there are two bunks facing the corridor, and the other side is an alcove, with six bunks, three on each wall. I got the top bunk. It was a military effort monkeying my way up and down. I had a small rack to keep things up high with me, but other than that, it was a narrow, hard space to sleep. Two sheets and a blanket were provided, and at least it was air con. I was lucky to be up high, so my feet could overhang without people brushing by all night.